Audit: Ship Inspection

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Audit: Ship Inspection

1. General Information

1.1 Name of the vessel

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1.2 Vessel IMO Number

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1.3 Company IMO Number

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1.4 Date of Inspection was completed:Note: If the inspection extends to two or more days, record the circumstances in the charter end additional comments:

1.5 Port Of Inspection

1.6 Flag:If a change of flag has taken place within the past 6 month, record the date of change and the previous flag in comments

1.7 Deadweight: (metric tonnes)Note: for vessels with multiple load line certificates, record the maximum of the assigned deadweights.

1.8 Gross Tonnage:

1.9 Date the vessel was deliveredNote: the date of delivery from the original builders as listed in the IOPPC must be recorded. if the date of delivery is not recorded in the IOPPC form A or Form B, the date of delivery as contained in the Safety Construction Certificate must be recorded. if the vessel has been re-aged the original build date must be recorded

1.10 name of OCIMF inspecting company:Note: The SIRE Report Editor software automatically inserts the name of the inspecting company.

1.11 Time the inspector boarded the vessel:

1.12 Time the inspector departed the vessel:If the inspection took place over two or more days, in two or more sessions, or was carried out by more than one inspector, record the arrival and departure details in comments.

1.13 Name of the inspectorNote: The VIQ software automatically inserts the name of the inspector. This is for use by the inspecting Company and for OCIMF internal purposes only and will not displayed on the delivered report.

1.14 Vessel Operation at the time of the inspection

1.15 Products being handled

1.16 Is an up date OCIMF Harmonized Vessel Particulars Questionnaire (HVPQ) maintained and is it readily available?

1.17 Vessel Type

1.18 Hull TypeNote: Refer to the IOPPC Form B/5 to determine the construction requirement.

1.19 Name of the vessels operatorNote: for the purpose of the sire programme, an operator is defined as the company or entity which exercises day to day operational control of, and responsibility for, a vessel. The name of this entity can be found in the vessel's Document of Compliance. The registered owner of a vessel may or may not be the operator.

1.20 Address of the vessels operatorNote: If the report is to be forwarded to an alternative address, record the details.

1.21 Telephone number of the operator

1.22 E-mail address of the operator

1.23 Date the current operator assumed responsibility for the vessel

1.24 Date of the last port state control InspectionNote: The Date refers to anny port state inspection

1.25 Port of Last port state control inspection:If the vessel was detained,, or if significant deficiencies were listed, record the reason for the detention or the nature of those deficiencies in comments,

1.26 Name of Classification society:If the vessel has record the name of the classification society issuing the statutory certificates and the name of the second society in other comments..If the vessel has changed class within the past 6 month, record the previous classification society and date of change as an Observation.

1.27 Date of expiry of the class Certificate:Note: This will usually be the same date as that of the next special survey.

1.28 Date the last special survey was completed

1.29 Date of departure from the last class-credited dry dock/repair period:In addition, if the last dry docking was unscheduled, record the date and the reason.

1.30 Date of the last class Survey Status Report:

1.31What was the Operator’s defined maximum level of blood alcohol content?OCIMF recommends that officers and ratings observe a period of abstinence from alcohol prior to scheduled watchkeeping duty or work periods. The objective should always be to ensure that, prior to going on scheduled duty the blood alcohol content of the seafarer is theoretically zero.

1.32What was the recorded frequency of unannounced drug testing?

1.33What was the recorded frequency of unannounced alcohol testing?The frequency of unannounced testing should be sufficient so as to serve as an effective deterrent to abuse.

1.34What was the date of the last unannounced on-board alcohol test?

1.35What was the date of the last unannounced drug and alcohol test undertaken by an external agency?

2. Certification and Documentation

CERTIFICATES:

2.1Are all the statutory certificates listed below, where applicable, valid and have the annual and intermediate surveys been carried out within the required range dates?

2.1.1 Certificate of RegistryThe Certificate of Registry should also state the service of the vessel – i.e. products and chemical tanker.The registered address of the owner should be recorded on the Certificate of Registry.

2.1.2 Continuous Synopsis RecordThe CSR records shall be kept on board the ship and shall be available for inspection at all times. Issued in accordance with SOLAS XI-1/5 by the Administration, from 1st July 2004. The Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR) may be provided in hard copy or in electronic format. Whenever any change to the entries listed in the current CSR document has taken place, pending the issue of a revised and updated CSR, the operator or the Master is required to complete an amendment form (Form 2), the original of which is to be attached to the current CSR. The index of amendments (Form 3) must be updated. Only the ship’s Administration can issue a ship’s CSR document (Form 1) to a ship. The first CSR document issued to a ship is numbered 1 and subsequent CSR documents are to be sequentially numbered. The sequential numbering continues across change of flag throughout the life of the ship.The operator or Master is required to complete the Amendment Form 2, the original of which must be attached to the current CSR, if there any amendments to any of the information recorded on the original CSR. A copy should be forwarded to the Administration. Form 3, the Index of Amendments, must be updated.

2.1.3 Document of Compliance (DoC)The issuing authority for the DoC and the SMC may be different organisations, but the name of the operator of the vessel must be the same on both.There should be a copy (which need not be a certified copy) of the DoC on board, which shows that the original has been endorsed for the annual verification.The document should detail the cargo types the operator’s vessels are certified to carry – i.e. oil, chemicals and/or gas.The Document of Compliance does not need to be endorsed for chemicals if the vessel has only a NLS Certificate and not a Certificate of Fitness.An annual audit should be carried out within three months of the anniversary of the date of issue.

2.1.4 Safety Management Certificate (SMC)The SMC is subject to renewal verification every five years and at least one intermediate verification, which, if only one, shall be between the second and third anniversary.

2.1.5 Safety Equipment Certificate, supplemented by Form EThe Safety Equipment Certificate does not need to be endorsed for chemicals if the vessel has only a NLS Certificate and not a Certificate of Fitness. The Long Range Identification and Tracking System entered into force on the 31st December 2008 or the first Radio Survey after that date. It applies to all cargo ships greater than 300 gt constructed before 31st December 2008 operating in Sea Areas A1, A2 and A3 (Not applicable to ships fitted with AIS operating solely in Sea Area A1).Some class societies consider that if a vessel is fitted with an ECD and a full set of paper charts, the charts can be considered as a back-up to the ‘ECDIS’, and thus Form E endorsed to the effect that a back-up was fitted.

2.1.6 Safety Radio Certificate, supplemented by Form R

2.1.7 Safety Construction CertificateThe Safety Equipment, Safety Radio and Safety Construction Certificates might be on the same form, called the Ship Safety Certificate. Form C will be attached instead of Forms E and R. There should be evidence that each annual survey has been carried out.The Safety Construction Certificate does not need to be endorsed for chemicals if the vessel has only a NLS Certificate and not a Certificate of Fitness.

2.1.8 IOPP Certificate, supplemented by Form A or BForm B is only required if carrying oil cargoes or oil-like noxious liquids substances. A list of the oil-like noxious liquid substances allowed to be carried must be included.Statement of Compliance supplementRequired for vessels subject to the Condition Assessment Scheme (see question 2.22). A Statement of Compliance should be issued by the Administration every 2½ years.In accordance with MARPOL Annex 1/9 the IOPP Certificate shall be in either English, French or Spanish.

2.1.9 What is the vessel’s designation as recorded in the IOPP Certificate, Form B, Question 1.11?Crude oil tanker;Product carrier;Product carrier not carrying fuel oil or heavy diesel oil as referred to in Regulation 20.2 or lubricating oil;Crude oil/product carrier;Combination carrier;Ship, other than an oil tanker, with cargo tanks coming under Regulation 2.2 of Annex 1 of the Convention;Oil tanker dedicated to the carriage of products referred to in Regulation 2.4;The ship, being designated as a ‘crude oil tanker’ operating with COW, is also designated as a ‘product carrier’ operating with CBT, for which a separate IOPP Certificate has also been issued;The ship, being designated as a ‘product carrier’ operating with CBT, is also designated as a ‘crude oil tanker’ operating with COW, for which a separate IOPP Certificate has also been issued.

2.1.10 Minimum Safe Manning DocumentIf the language used is not English, the information (contained in the Minimum Safe Manning Doc) given should include a translation into English. IMO Res. A.890 (21) Annex 3.2.

2.1.11 Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Chemicals or GasThis will be issued either under the IBC or BCH Code for chemicals, or the IGC, GC or EGC Code for gas. Gas carriers carrying dual code cargoes must have a NLS Certificate. Chemical Certificates of Fitness must have been renewed prior to 1st January 2007.The ISPP Certificate is subject to intermediate survey only.

2.1.12 Noxious Liquid Substances (NLS) CertificateNLS means any substance indicated in the pollution category column on chapter 17 or 18 of the IBC Code or provisionally assessed under the provision of Reg. 6.3 as falling into Cat X, Y or Z. An NLS tanker is a ship constructed or adapted for the carriage of any liquid product listed in chapter 17 of the IBC. Gas carriers carrying dual-code cargoes will require both a Certificate of Fitness for gas cargoes and an NLS Certificate for the carriage of noxious liquid substances.It is not a requirement that the Document of Compliance and Safety Equipment and Safety Construction Certificates are endorsed 'Chemical tanker' when the vessel is only carrying chemicals under a NLS Certificate.Oil-Like NLS may only be carried on chemical tankers after 1st January 2007.Under the Annex II revisions chemical carriers will be issued with either a CoF or a NLS Certificate, but not both. Gas carriers carrying dual-code cargoes will require both a CoF and a NLS Certificate.

2.1.13 Civil Liability Convention (1992) CertificateThe name of the owner should be the same as that on the Certificate of Registry.The name and address of the owner must be that of the registered owner even if the bareboat charterer is named on the Certificate of Registry.

2.1.14 Name of P and I Club:The name of the owner should be the same as that on the Certificate of Registry. A P and I Club Certificate of Entry should be provided to prove membership for the current year, which usually begins on the 20th February. Record if the vessel is entered under the TOPIA 06 (Tanker Oil Pollution Indemnification Agreement 2006) or STOPIA 06. (Small Tanker Oil Pollution Indemnification Agreement 2006). These agreements are intended to result in oil pollution claims falling within the 1992 Civil Liability Convention, the 1992 Fund Convention and the 2003 Supplementary Fund Protocol to be shared more equitably between ship owners and the oil receivers who contribute to the 1992 Fund and the Supplementary Fund. This information will be recorded in the P & I Certificate of Entry. The monetary value of the coverage must not be recorded.

2.1 NOTE:With respect to SOLAS certificates, if the language used is neither English nor French, the text shall include a translation into one of these languages.(SOLAS I/15)Note: Situations may arise in cases where a Recognised Organisation (RO) issues the original certificates and the vessel’s flag State Administration conducts subsequent annual surveys. In such cases, it is acceptable for the flag State to endorse the RO’s certificates to attest that the annual surveys have been conducted.Company and registered owner identification number is required to be recorded on these certificates either from 1st January 2009, or on the occasion of renewals of the certificates as may be required by the flag State Administration.Certification should be checked to ensure that it is correctly completed. Common problems are as follows:An incorrect deadweight entered on a certificate;The maximum deadweight for those vessels with multiple Load Line Certificates not entered;When certified for the carriage of both petroleum and chemicals (not solely under an NLS Certificate) the Safety Equipment, Safety Construction, Safety Management and ISS Certificates to be endorsed for both petroleum and chemicals;Incorrect sludge tanks entered in IOPP Form B section 3.1. Bilge tanks can, but are not required to be, entered in section 3.3;With vessels with multiple load lines, only the current Loadline Certificate should be in the certificate file, the others should be in the master’s safe;Residual tanks are likely to be fitted with a connection to the cargo system and therefore should be considered as cargo tanks and have venting arrangements, secondary venting, and inert gas if fitted. They do not need to be identified as slop tanks but should be included in the total tank capacity in Form B section of the IOPP Certificate.At least one Administration – Liberia – now issues electronic certificates and documents. These correspond to the forms required by SOLAS and MARPOL and contain electronic signatures and seals. The Liberian Administration states that these certificates shall at all times be considered valid. They are transmitted electronically and are protected from alteration or tampering. Inspectors should if necessary consider requesting evidence that the certificates and documents were actually sent by the Administration. Confirmation of the validity of a certificate or document may also be obtained from the Administration – in the case of Liberia at www.liscr.com ‘Document verification’. Each certificate and document has a unique Tracking Identification Number.

Safety Management and the Operator’s Procedures Manuals:

2.2 Do the operator’s procedures manuals comply with ISM Code requirements?

2.3 Does the Operator’s representative visit the vessel at least bi-annually?Record the date of the last visit.Note: The Operator’s representative must be a Technical/Marine superintendent or person familiar with the company's SMS and responsible for its implementation. The Operator’s representative’s visits should occur at approximately six month intervals.

2.4 Is a recent operator’s audit report available and is a close-out system in place for dealing with non-conformities?Note: This audit must be conducted as part of the operator’s SMS procedures. Satisfactory evidence should record that corrective action was taken to rectify non-conformities. A close-out system, which includes a time limit for corrective action, informing the operator when completed and the operator ensuring that it has been, should be in place and the inspector should ensure that the required actions have been made within the required time. Inspectors must not use Operator’s audits as a means to record Observations.

2.5Does the Master review the safety management system and report to the operator on any deficiencies?Note: The Master’s review should be carried out annually and documentary evidence should be available.

Survey and Repair History:

2.6Are class survey reports adequately filed?Note: The file should contain class reports based on annual, intermediate, special and occasional surveys. The survey and repair reports should be adequately filed to facilitate checking.

2.7Is the vessel free of conditions of class or significant recommendations, memoranda or notations?Note: If conditions of class have not been completed by the required due date, then the classification of the vessel may be subject to suspension. If a Class notation requires a ballast tank to be inspected annually, record this as an Observation.

2.8Are procedures in place to carry out regular inspections of cargo and ballast tanks, void spaces, trunks and cofferdams by the vessel’s personnel and are records maintained?

Enhanced Survey Programme:

2.9If the vessel is subject to the Enhanced Survey Programme, is the report file adequately maintained?

2.10Is a thickness measurement report available?Give brief details of the results of the thickness measurements.

2.11Is the following documentation available on board?Main structural plans for cargo and ballast tanks;Previous repair history;Cargo and ballast history;Extent of use of the inert gas plant and tank cleaning procedures.Note: This documentation need not necessarily be kept in the same file.

Condition Assessment Scheme:

2.12If the vessel is subject to the Condition Assessment Scheme (CAS), are copies of the Condition Assessment Scheme Final Report and Review Record available?

2.13Has a Survey Plan for the CAS been completed and submitted by the operator?Note: The Survey Plan should be submitted not less than 2 months prior to the commencement of CAS.

2.14 Has the vessel been enrolled in a Classification Society Condition Assessment programme (CAP)? Note: Condition Assessment Programme (CAP) is a voluntary programme for ships over a certain DWT and age, if the vessel is NOT enrolled in CAP then answer the question ‘NA’.

Publications:

2.15Are the publications listed in the table below, as applicable to the vessel, available?Note: The inspector should make spot checks to ensure that the publications, as appropriate to the vessel, are provided.

General and Management Publications:

2.15.1SOLAS Consolidated editionIMO5th 2009

2.15.2International Life Saving Appliance Code (LSA Code)The Code includes ’Testing and Evaluation of Lifesaving Equipment’.IMO3rd2010

2.15.2International Life Saving Appliance Code (LSA Code)The Code includes ’Testing and Evaluation of Lifesaving Equipment’.IMO3rd2010

2.15.3International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code)IMO2nd2007

2.15.4International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code)IMO1st2003

2.15.5International Safety Management Code (ISM Code) and the guidelines of the implementation of the ISM Code.IMO3rd 2010

2.15.6International Standards on Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW)These are to include amendments 2 and 3.IMO-2001

2.15.7Guidance Manual for Tanker StructuresTSCF/IACS1st 1997

2.15.8Guidelines for the Control of Drugs and Alcohol on Board ShipsOCIMF-1995

2.15.9Guidelines on FatigueIt is recommended that the publication ‘The Human Element, a guide to Human Behaviour in the Shipping Industry’ published by the UK MCA be carried on board to add further guidance on the issue of fatigue. This question is not to be marked 'NO', if this publication is not carried. IMO2002

Navigational Publications:

2.15.10Bridge Procedures GuideICS4th 2007

2.15.11Collision Regulations, Consolidated editionIMO4th2003

2.15.12Bridge Team ManagementNI2nd2004

2.15.13Ship’s RouteingIMO9th2008

2.15.14International Code of SignalsIMO4th 2005

2.15.15International Aeronautical and Maritime Searchand Rescue Manual, IAMSAR Manual (Volume III)IMO8th 2010

2.15.16Peril at Sea and SalvageOCIMF/ICS5th1998

2.15.17Guide to Helicopter/Ship OperationsICS4th2008

Mooring Publications:

2.15.18Mooring Equipment GuidelinesOCIMF3rd2008

2.15.19Effective MooringOCIMF3rd 2010

2.15.20Recommendations for Equipment employed in the Bow Mooring of Ships at Single Point MooringsOCIMF4th2007

2.15.21Anchoring Systems and ProceduresPublished October 2010, owners should be given until January 2012 to obtain a copy. OCIMF1st2010

General Tanker Publications:

2.15.22MARPOL 73/78 Consolidated editionIMO-2006

2.15.23Guidelines for the Implementation of MARPOL Annex VIMO2006

2.15.24ISGOTTOCIMF/ICS5th2006

2.15.25Ship to Ship Transfer Guide (Petroleum)OCIMF/ICS4th2005

2.15.26USCG CFR 33 Parts 1 – 124 USCG CFR 33 Parts 125 – 199 USCG CFR 46 Parts 1 – 40 USCG-2006

Petroleum Tanker Specific Publications:

2.15.27Recommendations for Oil Tanker Manifolds and Associated EquipmentOCIMF4th1991

2.15.28Inert Gas SystemsIMO3rd1990

2.15.29Crude Oil Washing SystemsIMO4th2000

Chemical Tanker Specific Publications:

2.15.30IBC Code, combined with the Index of Dangerous ChemicalsRequired for any vessel carrying MARPOL Annex II cargoes, including gas carriers carrying dual code cargoes. The Index is part of the Code.IMO3rd 2007

2.15.31Code for the Construction & Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk, 2008 Edition Code with amendments, if applicableIMO2008

2.15.32Tanker Safety Guide (Chemicals)ICS3rd 2002

Gas Tanker Specific Publications:

2.15.33IGC Code and 1993 supplementRequired for any vessel carrying gas cargoes. IMO2nd1993

2.15.34GC Code, if applicableIMO-1983

2.15.35EGC Code, if applicable and 1980 supplementIMO-1976

2.15.36Tanker Safety Guide (Liquefied Gas)ICS 2nd 1995

2.15.37Ship to Ship Transfer Guide (Liquefied Gas) (LPG tankers only)OCIMF/ICS2nd 1995

2.15.38Liquefied Gas Handling Principles on Ships and TerminalsSIGTTO3rd2000

2.15.39An Introduction to the Design and Maintenance of Cargo System Pressure Relief Valves on Board Gas TankersSIGTTO2nd1998

2.15.40Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sampling Procedures (LPG Tankers Only) SIGTTO1st2010

2.15 NOTE: Consolidated editions of SOLAS do not contain the requirements for vessels constructed before the date that some Chapters of the particular edition were published. Previous editions of SOLAS and their amendments, as applicable to the vessel, should therefore be retained on board for reference.

3. Crew Management

Note: Co-operation and communication between officers and crew should be observed and evaluated. All parties should share a common goal to operate the vessel safely and efficiently.

3.1Does the manning level meet or exceed that required by the Minimum Safe Manning Document?

3.2Are the STCW and flag Administration’s regulations that control hours of work to minimise fatigue being followed?

3.3Do all personnel maintain hours of rest records and are the hours of rest in compliance with ILO or STCW requirements?

3.4Are all personnel able to communicate effectively in a common language?

3.5Does the operator provide a training policy exceeding statutory requirements?

3.6Have senior deck officers attended bridge team management courses?

3.7Has the Master attended a ship handling course where applicable?

3.8No question assigned.

3.9Where the vessel carries chemicals, has a formal programme of regular and appropriate medical examinations for personnel been implemented?

Crew Qualifications:

3.10Does the officers’ matrix posted for the vessel on the SIRE website accurately reflect the information relating to the officers on board at the time of the inspection?

3.11Are those officers who have immediate responsibility for cargo transfer, in possession of the Certificates of Specialised Training as applicable to the type of cargo being carried?

Drug and Alcohol Policy:

3.12Does the operator’s Drug and Alcohol policy meet OCIMF guidelines?

4. Navigation

General

Inspection of the bridge will normally take place when the vessel is alongside a terminal therefore the inspector must closely inspect charts, log books and other records to determine that the vessel has been safely navigated and that the bridge has at all times been adequately manned. Compliance with the operator’s navigation procedures should be evaluated both by observation and by discussion with the Master and officers. The operator’s navigation procedures must be supplemented as required by the Master’s Standing Orders and the Bridge Order Book. The objective should be to ascertain that such policies are understood and are being complied with. All navigation equipment should be in an operational condition regardless as to whether or not it is required by SOLAS. Any bridge equipment which is not functioning must be recorded as an Observation.

Policies, Procedures and Documentation:

4.1Is the vessel provided with adequate operator’s navigation instructions and procedures?

4.2Has the Master written his own Standing Orders and are Bridge Orders being completed?

4.3Have the deck officers countersigned the Master’s Standing Orders and Bridge Orders as being read and understood?

4.4Are deck log books and engine movement (bell) books correctly maintained and is an adequate record being kept of all the navigational activities, both at sea and under pilotage?

4.5Are the vessel’s manoeuvring characteristics displayed on the bridge?

4.6Are procedures in place for the testing of bridge equipment before arrival and departure?

4.7Are records maintained of fire and safety rounds being completed after each watch?

4.8Are checklists for pre-arrival, pre-departure, watch handover, pilot-Master exchange and pilot card effectively completed?

4.9Does the operator provide guidance on minimum under keel clearance and squat?

4.10Is an effective bridge team structure in place?

4.11Has the bridge been adequately manned at all stages of the voyage?

4.12Are the bridge lookout arrangements adequate?

Navigation Equipment:

4.13If a bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) is fitted is it operational at all times when the vessel is at sea?

4.14Is the standard magnetic compass operational, properly maintained and adjusted?

4.15Is the gyro compass operating satisfactorily?

4.16Are auto to manual steering changeover procedures clearly identified?

4.17Is manual steering used during periods of river transits and when navigating through restricted waters?

4.18Are regular gyro and magnetic compass errors being taken and are they being recorded?

4.19Do the magnetic compass errors recorded in the compass error book broadly agree with the deviation card?

Charts and Publications:

4.20Has a system been established to ensure that nautical publications and charts are on board and current?

4.21If the vessel is provided solely with paper charts are all charts required for the trading areas of the vessel on board and are these fully corrected?

4.22Were the charts used for the previous voyage appropriate?

4.23If the vessel is provided solely with paper charts, does the operator have procedures in place to prepare for the mandatory introduction of ECDIS?

4.24If the vessel is equipped with an Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS), are the Master and deck watchkeeping officers able to produce appropriate documentation that generic and type-specific ECDIS familiarisation has been undertaken?

4.25If the vessel is provided solely with an Electronic Chart Display and Information System (EDCIS) does it meet the requirements of SOLAS?

4.26If the vessel is provided with an Electronic Chart Display and Information System (EDCIS) that uses a paper chart back-up system, are the paper charts provided, adequate for the areas in which the ship trades and are they fully corrected?

4.27Are Lists of Lights, Tide Tables, Sailing Directions, the Nautical Almanac, the Annual Summary of Notices to Mariners and the Chart Catalogue the current editions and have they been maintained up to date where required?

Navigation:

4.28Has the vessel been safely navigated and in compliance with international regulations?

4.29Is the echo sounder recorder marked with a reference date and time on each occasion it is switched on?

4.30Was a comprehensive passage plan available for the previous voyage and did it cover the full voyage from berth to berth?

4.31Was position fixing satisfactory throughout the previous voyage and the frequency of plotted fixes in accordance with the passage plan?

4.32Was radar parallel indexing used to monitor the position of the vessel?

4.33During pilotage, was the position of the vessel adequately monitored?

4.34Has the GPS been adjusted to the correct datum?

4.35Is there an adequate system for dealing with navigation warnings and are they being charted?

Navigation Equipment:

4.36Is navigation equipment appropriate for the size of the vessel and in good order?

4.36Is navigation equipment appropriate for the size of the vessel and in good order?

The following applies to all vessels constructed (i.e. keel laid) before 1st July 2002. All ships, irrespective of size:

4.36.1A receiver for a global navigation satellite system or terrestrial navigation radio navigation system.

4.36.2A Navtex receiver.

4.36.3A whistle, bell and gong.

4.36.4Shapes.

All ships of 150 gt and upwards:

4.36.5A properly adjusted standard magnetic compass.

4.36.6A steering magnetic compass.

4.36.7Means for taking bearings.

4.36.8A spare magnetic compass.

4.36.9A telephone.

4.36.10A daylight signalling lamp.

All ships of 300 gt and upwards on international voyages:

4.36.11An automatic identification system (AIS).

4.36.12A VHF radio.

4.26.12aAll ships of 300 gt and upwards shall be fitted with a system to automatically transmit.

All ships of 500 gt and upwards:

4.36.13A gyro compass and repeaters.

4.36.14Visual compass readings to the emergency steering position.

4.36.15A radar installation.

4.36.16Radar plotting equipment.

4.36.17An echo sounder.

4.36.18A speed and distance indicator.

4.36.19Rudder angle, RPM, variable pitch and bow/stern thruster indicators.

All tankers of 3,000 gt and upwards:

-A voyage data recorder.

All ships of 10,000 gt and upwards:

4.36.20Radar installations.

4.36.21An ARPA.

All ships of 100,000 gt and upwards:

4.36.22A rate of turn indicator.

The following applies to all vessels constructed (i.e. keel laid) after 1st July 2002.(SOLAS 2004 V/19) All ships, irrespective of size:

4.36.23A receiver for a global satellite navigation system or terrestrial navigation radio navigation system.

4.36.24A Navtex receiver.

4.36.25A whistle, bell and gong.

4.36.26Shapes.

4.36.27A properly adjusted magnetic compass.

4.36.28A pelorus or compass bearing device.

4.36.29Means of correcting heading and bearings to true at all times.

4.36.30A sound reception system.

4.36.31A telephone.

All ships of 150 gt and upwards:

4.36.32A spare magnetic compass.

4.36.33A daylight signalling lamp.

SAll ships of 300 gt and upwards:

4.36.34An echo sounding device.

4.36.35A 9 GHz (3 cm ‘X’ band) radar.

4.36.36An electronic plotting aid.

4.36.37A speed and distance measuring device.

4.36.38A properly adjusted transmitting heading device.

4.36.39A VHF radio.

SAll ships of 300 gt and upwards on international voyages:

4.36.40An automatic identification system (AIS).

All ships of 500 gt and over:

4.36.41A gyro compass.

4.36.42A gyro compass heading repeater.

4.36.43A gyro compass bearing repeater.

4.36.44Rudder, propeller, thrust, pitch and operational mode indicators.

4.36.45An automatic tracking aid.

All ships of 3,000 gt and upwards:

4.36.46A 3 GHz (10 cm, ‘X’ band) radar.

4.36.47A second automatic tracking aid.

4.36.48A voyage data recorder (VDR)

All ships of 10,000 gt and upwards:

4.36.49An ARPA, equipped with speed through the water input.

4.36.50A heading or track control system.

All ships of 50,000 gt and upwards:

4.36.51A rate of turn indicator.

4.36.52A speed and distance measuring device.

Chronometers

4.37Are navigation lights in good order?

5. Safety Management

5.1Has a Safety Officer been designated and trained to undertake this role?

5.2Are the ship’s officers familiar with the operation of fire fighting, life saving and other emergency equipment?

5.3Is personal protective equipment such as boiler suits, safety footwear, eye and ear protection, safety harnesses and chemical protective equipment etc. provided and as required, being worn?

5.4Are all hand torches approved for use in gas-hazardous areas?

5.5Are regular safety meetings held, are the minutes recorded and does the operator provide shore management responses?

5.6Is there a procedure for the reporting, investigation and close-out of accidents, incidents, non-conformities and near misses?

5.7Is a completed ISGOTT Ship/Shore Safety Check List (SSSCL) available and are its provisions being complied with?

5.8Are smoking regulations posted and being adhered to and are smoke rooms adequately identified?

5.9Are external doors, ports and windows kept closed in port?

5.10Is the accommodation space atmosphere being maintained at a higher pressure than that of the ambient air?

5.11Is all loose gear on deck, in stores and in internal spaces properly secured?

Drills, Training and Familiarisation:Note: In accordance with the summarised SMS requirements accompanying question 2.2, drills involving relevant personnel should be carried out at regular intervals taking into account the ship type, personnel changes and any other relevant circumstances. Each drill should be as realistic as circumstances allow and there should be a review upon completion. Any action required to improve effectiveness should be noted and acted upon. Use of electronic interactive training aids can be beneficial, provided their use is structured and progress of individuals is monitored.

5.12Is there a procedure for familiarisation for new personnel?

5.13Are drills for emergency procedures being carried out?

5.14Are lifeboat and fire drills regularly held?

5.15Is regular training in the use of life-saving equipment being undertaken?

5.16Are pollution clean-up drills regularly held to determine that the shipboard pollution plan is up-to-date and efficient and are there records?

Ship Security:

Notes: The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code came into force on 1st July 2004.Inspectors should not request to sight sensitive material, but confirm only with the Master, that procedures or records are available or maintained.

5.17Are ship security records related to port calls being maintained?

5.18Are ship security records related to the ship security plan being maintained?

5.19Has the operator furnished the Master with the information required by the ISPS Code?

5.20Has a ship Security Officer been designated?

5.21Has the ship security officer received adequate training?

5.22Is an adequate deck watch being maintained to prevent unauthorised access?

5.23Has a gangway notice been posted, at the shore end of the gangway where possible?

Enclosed Space and Pump Room Entry Procedures:

An enclosed space is a space that has limited openings for entry and exit, unfavourable natural ventilation, and that is not designed for continuous worker occupancy.(ISGOTT Definitions p xxvi) Enclosed spaces include, but are not limited to, cargo spaces, double bottoms, fuel tanks, ballast tanks, pump rooms, cofferdams, void spaces, duct keels, inter-barrier spaces, engine crankcases and sewage.The Master and responsible officer are responsible for determining whether entry into an enclosed space may be permitted. It is the duty of the responsible officer to ensure:That the space is ventilated;That the atmosphere in the compartment is tested and found satisfactory;That safeguards are in place to protect personnel from the hazards that are identified;That appropriate means for controlling entry are in place.Personnel carrying out work in an enclosed space are responsible for following the procedures and for using the safety equipment specified.Prior to entry into an enclosed space, a risk assessment should be completed to identify the potential hazards and to determine the safeguards to be adopted. The resulting safe working practice should be documented and approved by the responsible officer before being countersigned by the Master, who confirms that the practice is safe and in compliance with the ship’s Safety Management System. The permit, or other enabling document, should be sighted and completed by the person entering the space, prior to entry.The controls required for safe entry vary with the task being performed and the potential hazards identified during the risk assessment. However, in most cases an Entry Permit System will provide a convenient and effective means of ensuring and documenting that essential precautions have been taken and, where necessary, that physical safeguards have been put in place. The adoption of an Entry Permit System, which may include the use of a check list, is therefore recommended. Permission to continue work should only be given for a period sufficient to complete the task. Under no circumstances should the period exceed one day. A copy of the permit should be prominently displayed at the entrance to the space to inform personnel of the precautions to be taken when entering the space and of any restrictions placed upon the activities permitted within the space.The permit should be rendered invalid if ventilation of the space stops or if any of the conditions noted in the check list change.Restricting the issue of approvals, such as entry permits, so that all cargo tanks which are safe to enter are shown on one document, may be found to simplify the paper Administration, avoid overlapping and the possibility of confusion as to which approval applies to which tank. However, if such a system is used, there must be rigorous control to ensure cancellation of existing permits, and that the atmospheres of all named tanks are correctly tested at the time of issue so that an effective extension of a period of validity does not occur by default. It will be particularly important to ensure that the permit process is supplemented by the marking of tank lids with notices indicating which tanks are safe to enter.Inspection of cargo tanks after cleaning and before loading can require an independent surveyor to enter the tank. All relevant tank entry procedures must be observed.(ISGOTT 10.4)Note: The OCIMF Guidelines on Safety Management Systems for Hot Work and Entry into Enclosed Spaces (1st Edition September 2008) information paper must be taken into account in the development of enclosed space entry procedures.

5.24Are enclosed space entry procedures in accordance with the recommendations of ISGOTT and OCIMF guidelines?

5.25Are pump room entry procedures being complied with?

5.26Are pump room spaces adequately ventilated?

5.27Are pump room fire and flooding dampers clearly marked as to their operation and in good order?

5.28Are permanent arrangements provided for lifting an incapacitated person from the cargo and, if applicable, the ballast pump room, including provision of a suitable stretcher or harness and is the equipment in good order?

Monitoring Non-Cargo Spaces:

Note: Void and ballast tank spaces within the cargo tank block should be routinely monitored to check that no leakage has occurred from adjacent cargo tanks. Monitoring should include regular checks for hydrocarbon content and regular sounding/ullaging of the empty spaces, particularly to ensure that ballast, before it is discharged, is clean.

5.29Are spaces adjacent to cargo tanks, including pipe ducts, regularly monitored for accumulations of gas?

5.30Where a fixed system to monitor flammable atmospheres in non-cargo spaces is fitted, are recorders and alarms in order?

Gas Analysing Equipment:

5.31Are portable gas and oxygen analysers appropriate to the cargoes being carried and are they in good order?

5.32Are officers familiar with use and calibration of portable oxygen and hydrocarbon analysers?

5.33Is there a record of regular testing and calibration of portable analysers?

5.34Is sufficient span calibration gas available for the types of fixed and portable analysers on board?

5.35On vessels fitted with an inert gas system, are instruments capable of measuring hydrocarbon content in an oxygen deficient atmosphere available, if required and in good order?

5.36Where toxic gases may be encountered, are appropriate toxic gas detection analysers available and in good order?

Hot Work Procedures:

5.37 Are hot work procedures in accordance with the recommendations of ISGOTT Section 9.4 and OCIMF guidelines?

5.38 Is electric welding equipment in good order and are written safety guidelines available on site?

5.39 Is gas welding and burning equipment in good order?

5.40 Is fixed piping installed from the gas cylinders to the operating position?

5.41 Are flashback arrestors fitted at the cylinders and at the workstation and are they in good order?

5.42 Are spare oxygen and acetylene cylinders stored apart in a dedicated storage and is the storage in a clearly marked, well-ventilated position outside the accommodation and engine room?

Life Saving Equipment:

Before the ship leaves port and at all times during the voyage, all life-saving appliances shall be in working order and ready for immediate use.(SOLAS III/20.2)Note: The technical specifications and requirements for life-saving appliances are contained in the Life-Saving Appliances Code.

5.43Are ship-specific Life-Saving Equipment Training Manuals available?

5.44Are ship-specific life-saving equipment maintenance instructions available and are weekly and monthly inspections being carried out?

5.45Are muster lists and lifejacket donning instructions displayed?

5.46Is there a maintenance and test schedule for lifeboat on-load release gear?

5.47Are lifeboats, including their equipment and launching mechanisms, in good order?

5.48Are lifeboat and liferaft operating instructions displayed?

5.49Is the rescue boat, including its equipment and launching arrangement, in good order?

5.50Are liferafts in good order?

5.51Are hydrostatic releases, where fitted, correctly attached and in good order?

5.52Are survival craft portable VHF radios and Search and Rescue Locating Devices in good order and charged?

5.53Are lifebuoys, lights, buoyant lines, quick release mechanisms and self-activating smoke floats in good order?

5.54Are lifejackets in good order?

5.55Are immersion suits in a good order?

5.56Are pyrotechnics, including line throwing apparatus, in date and in good order?

5.57Are the locations of life saving appliances marked with IMO symbols?

Fire Fighting Equipment:

Fire fighting systems and appliances shall be kept in good working order and readily available for immediate use. Portable extinguishers which have been discharged shall be immediately recharged or replaced with an equivalent unit.(SOLAS II-2/14.2.1.2)By the first scheduled dry-docking after 1st January 2010, fixed carbon dioxide fire-extinguishing systems for the protection of machinery spaces and cargo pump-rooms on ships constructed before 1st July 2002 shall comply with the provisions of paragraph 2.2.2 of chapter 5 of the Fire Safety Systems Code.(SOLAS 2-II/10.4.1.5)Note: This requires two separate controls within a clearly identified release box to release the CO2 and activate an audible alarm. One control shall open the piping valve for the gas and the second control discharge the gas from the containers. If the release box is locked, a key shall be located adjacent in a break glass type enclosure.

5.58Are ship-specific Fire Training Manuals available?

5.59Are ship-specific Fire Safety Operational Booklets available?

5.60Are ship-specific fire fighting equipment maintenance instructions available and are weekly and monthly inspections being carried out?

5.61Are records available to show that samples of foam compound have been tested at regular intervals?

5.62Is a fire control plan exhibited within the accommodation, is a copy also available externally, and is equipment correctly marked on it?

5.63Are fire mains, pumps, hoses and nozzles in good order and available for immediate use?

5.64Are isolating valves in fire and foam system lines clearly marked and in good order?

5.65Is the International shore fire connection readily available externally and is the location clearly marked?

5.66Are fixed fire detection and alarm systems in good order and tested regularly?

5.67Are the main deck, pump room, engine room and other fixed fire extinguishing systems, where fitted, in good order and are clear operating instructions posted?

5.68Is the emergency fire pump in full operational condition and are starting instructions clearly displayed?

5.69Are portable fire extinguishers in good order with operating instructions clearly marked?

5.70Are firemen's outfits and breathing apparatus in good order and ready for immediate use?

5.71Are breathing apparatus sets fitted with fully pressurised air cylinders?

5.72Are emergency escape breathing devices (EEBD’s) in the accommodation, pump room and engine room in good order and ready for immediate use?

5.73Are accommodation and ventilation fan emergency stops in good order and clearly marked to indicate the spaces they serve?

5.74Are fire flaps in good order and clearly marked to indicate the spaces they serve?

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

5.75Are Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) on board for all the cargo products being handled and are all officers familiar with their use?

5.76Have Material Data Safety Sheets been provided for the bunkers currently on board?

5.77Are chemicals properly stowed and are Material Safety Data Sheets available?

5.78Are Material Safety Data Sheets provided for paints, protective coatings and all other corrosive or toxic materials that are carried on board?

Access:

5.79Is a gangway provided?

5.80Are accommodation ladders, gangways, pilot ladders and pilot hoists, where fitted, in good order?

5.81Are all means of access satisfactory, including the provision of a safety net, lifebuoy and line?

5.82Are pilot boarding and access arrangements satisfactory?

5.83Are safe access to the bow arrangements satisfactory?

5.84If a helicopter landing or winching area is provided, does it meet ICS guidelines?

5.85If the bridge wing is used as a winching area, is a thorough risk assessment conducted?

6. Pollution Prevention

Oil Record Books:

6.1Are the Engine Room (Part I) and Cargo (Part II) Oil Record Books (ORBs) correctly completed?

6.2Do the sludge and bilge tanks designated in Form B of the IOPP Certificate and those listed in the Oil Record Book Part I, agree?

6.3Are the Oil Record Books free of any pollution incidents or violations?

6.4Have disposals of slops and dirty ballast been adequately recorded and were they in accordance with MARPOL?

6.5If the disposal of engine room oily water or sludge to a cargo or slop tank has taken place, has the event been recorded in both Oil Record Books, was the receiving tank free of cargo and have the transfer arrangements been approved by Class?

Shipboard Oil and Marine Pollution Emergency Plans:

6.6Is an approved MARPOL Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan (SOPEP) or Shipboard Marine Pollution Emergency Plan (SMPEP) provided?

6.7Does the plan include a description of equipment, its location, a plan for deployment and specific crewmember duties for handling small spills?

6.8Is the IMO Coastal Contact List up to date, is the Master aware of port contact procedures and has a contact list been made for this port?

6.9Is there a USCG approved Vessel Response Plan (VRP)?

6.10Name of the OPA-90 Qualified Individual (QI):

Cargo Operations and Deck Area Pollution Prevention:

6.11Are officers aware of the requirements of MARPOL with respect to the disposal of bilge water and cargo slops?

6.12Is the condition of scupper plugs satisfactory and are scuppers effectively plugged?

6.12Is the condition of scupper plugs satisfactory and are scuppers effectively plugged?

6.13Is the ship fitted with a maindeck boundary coaming?

6.14Are means readily available for dealing with small oil spills?

6.15Is the vessel free from any visible bulkhead, valve or pipeline leakage liable to cause pollution?

6.16Are cargo system sea and overboard valves suitably lashed, locked or blanked and are they thoroughly checked to ensure that they are fully closed prior to commencement of cargo transfer?

6.17If cargo sea suction valves are fitted, are adequate pollution prevention measures in place?

6.18If cargo sea suction valves are fitted, are valve-testing arrangements provided, are they in good order and regularly monitored for leakage?

6.19If ballast lines pass through cargo tanks are they tested regularly and the results recorded?

6.20Are oil spill containers and gratings in place under the cargo manifolds and are they in good order?

6.21Are manifold spill containers empty and are the drainage arrangements satisfactory?

6.22Are unused cargo and bunker pipeline manifolds fully bolted and are all drains and vents and unused gauge stems, suitably blanked or capped?

6.23Are suitable spill containers fitted around all fuel, diesel and lubricating oil tank vents?

6.24Is a suitable containment fitted around hydraulic and other deck machinery?

6.25Are the arrangements for the disposal of oily water in the foc's'le and other internal spaces adequate?

Pump Rooms and Oil Discharge Monitors:

6.26Are pump room bilge high level alarms fitted, regularly tested and the results recorded?

6.27Are adequate arrangements provided for pipeline draining and the disposal of pump room bilge accumulations?

6.28If an ODME is fitted, is it in good order and is there evidence of recent testing?

6.29If the ODME has not been operational, was the fact recorded in the Oil Record Book?

Ballast Water Management:

6.30Does the operator have a Class approved Ballast Water and Sediments Management Plan and are records being maintained of all ballast water exchanges?

6.31Can the vessel check or sample segregated ballast prior to deballasting?

6.32Are segregated ballast tanks free from evidence of oil?

Engine and Steering Compartments:

6.33Are the engine room bilge oily water pumping and disposal arrangements in good order?

6.34Are emergency bilge pumping arrangements ready for immediate use; is the emergency bilge suction clearly identified and, where fitted, is the emergency overboard discharge valve provided with a notice warning against accidental opening?

6.35Are dedicated sludge pumps free from any connection to a direct overboard discharge?

6.36Is the oily water separator in good order?

6.37Are specific warning notices posted to safeguard against the accidental opening of the overboard discharge valve from the oily water separator?

6.38If the oily water separator is not fitted with an automatic stopping device, do entries in the Oil Record Book Part 1 indicate that it has not been used in a Special Area?

6.39Are the arrangements for the disposal of steering compartment oily bilge water adequate?

Garbage Management:

6.40Does the vessel have a Garbage Management Plan and has garbage been handled and disposed of in accordance with MARPOL?

6.41Has the Garbage Record Book been correctly completed?

Chapter 7. Structural Condition

(section name not set)

Note: Tank entry should only be undertaken if a suitable safe opportunity exists and if it is permitted by the inspecting OCIMF Member, the tanker operator and the terminal.

7.1Is the Enhanced Survey Programme file free from any information that raises concerns relating to the vessel’s structure?

7.2Is the hull free from visible structural defects that warrant further investigation?

7.3Are weather decks free from visible structural defects that warrant further investigation?

7.4Is the superstructure free from visible structural defects that warrant further investigation?

7.5Are internal spaces free from visible structural defects that warrant further investigation?

7.6If any cargo and/or ballast tanks were sighted from the deck, were they in good order?

7.7If any cargo and/or ballast tanks were inspected internally, were they in good order?

Chapter 8 Cargo and Ballast Systems - Petroleum

(section name not set)

Note: The International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals (ISGOTT) contains guidance pertaining to the safe carriage and handling of petroleum products. Inspectors should observe cargo operations, interview responsible personnel, review the operator’s operating procedures and observe the degree of compliance by officers and crew to appropriate regulations and guidelines. Common causes of incidents are poor planning, improper supervision of transfer operations, inadequate knowledge or disregard of the dangers of static electricity, insufficient personnel on duty and insufficient or incorrect information concerning cargo properties.

Policies, Procedures and Documentation:

8.1PIs the vessel provided with operator’s policy statements, guidance and procedures with regard to safe cargo operations?

8.2PIs information readily available on maximum loading rates and venting capacities?

8.3PAre legible and up to date pipeline and/or mimic diagrams of cargo, inert gas and venting systems, as applicable, available in the pump room(s) and cargo control area?

8.4PAre cargo pump performance curves available, where applicable, for various speeds?

8.5PIs a written procedure provided for the safe handling of heavy weather ballast in cargo tanks on segregated ballast tankers?

Stability and Cargo Loading Limitations:

8.6PIf a loading computer or programme is in use, is it class approved?

8.7PAre there records indicating that the operational accuracy of the load computer is tested regularly?

8.8PIs the stress and stability information included with the cargo plan and are any limitations understood by the cargo watch officers?

8.9PIs the vessel free of inherent intact stability problems?

8.10PAre Damage Stability Verification guidelines available?

8.11PDo the operator’s operating manuals include procedures for restoring stability in case of unstable conditions developing during cargo operations, where applicable?

8.12PWhere applicable, are officers aware of the dangers of free surface effects and of the possibility of structural damage caused by sloshing in cargo tanks?

8.13PAre cargo and/or ballast tanks free of sloshing or other restrictions?

Cargo Operations and Related Safety Management:

8.14PAre all officers familiar with the cargo system?

8.15PAre all officers familiar with the carriage requirements for the cargoes on board?

8.16PHas a cargo plan been prepared and does it contain a detailed sequence of cargo and ballast transfer?

8.17PHas the cargo plan been signed by the watch officers to indicate their understanding of it?

8.18PAre cargo operations being carried out and logged in accordance with the plan?

8.19PAre all officers aware of the emergency procedures for dealing with leakage, spillage or fire involving the cargo?

8.20PIs the verbal communication between the ship and the shore adequate?

Cargo and Ballast Handling and Monitoring Equipment:

8.21PAre the cargo, ballast and stripping pumps, eductors and their associated instrumentation and controls, in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.22PAre the cargo and ballast pump bearing, casing and shaft gland temperature monitoring sensors in good order and is there evidence of regular testing?

8.23PAre the cargo lines, crude oil washing lines, vapour lines and inert gas lines in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.24PIs the cargo pump emergency shutdown system in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.25PAre the cargo and ballast system valves in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.26PAre the cargo system ullage gauges, vapour locks and UTI tapes in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.27PAre the remote and local temperature and pressure sensors and gauges in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.28PAre the cargo tank high level and overflow alarms in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.29PAre cargo pipelines tested annually?

8.30PWhere fitted and in use, is the condition of the cargo tank heating system satisfactory, is it regularly tested and is any observation tank free of oil?

Ullaging, Sampling and Closed Operations:

8.31PAre vapour locks, where fitted, calibrated and certified by a recognised cargo inspection organisation?

8.32PIf fixed tank gauges are not fitted, are sufficient portable tapes provided to simultaneously gauge each tank being worked?

8.33PIf the vessel is handling volatile or toxic cargoes, is it operating in a closed condition?

8.34PIs the vessel provided with an approved vapour control system?

8.35PIs the vessel in possession of an approved Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Management Plan?

8.36PDo tank hatches, tank cleaning apertures and sighting ports appear to be liquid and gas tight?

Venting Arrangements:

8.37PIs the cargo venting system in good order?

8.38PIs the cargo venting system being operated correctly?

8.39PAre SOLAS secondary venting requirements being complied with?

8.40PIf stop valves are fitted which permit isolation of individual tanks from the common venting system, are they provided with positive locking arrangements and are the keys under the control of the person in overall charge of the cargo transfer?

8.41PAre the p/v valves in good order, inspected and cleaned as part of a regular planned maintenance routine and are there records to support this?

8.42PAre flame screens easily accessible and removable, in good order and inspected and cleaned as part of a regular maintenance routine and are there records available?

Inert Gas System:

For tankers of 20,000 tonnes deadweight and upwards, the protection of the cargo tanks shall be achieved by a fixed inert gas system. If the vessel is not fitted with an Inert Gas system questions 8.43 to 8.56 need not be answered. If the vessel is not fitted with an Inert gas system, then questions 8.43 to 8.56 will be removed within the inspector's programme software.

8.43PIs the vessel fitted with an inert gas system?

8.44PWas the inert gas system in use and operating satisfactorily at the time of the inspection?

8.45PIs a log kept of inert gas operations?

8.46PAre records maintained of equipment maintenance, including the overhaul of the non-return valve?

8.47PIs an operator’s policy provided that complies with IMO guidelines in case of failure of the inert gas system and do the Master, Chief Officer and the officers standing cargo watches understand this?

8.48PIs the inert gas system including instrumentation, alarms, trips and pressure and oxygen recorders, in good order?

8.49PIs the oxygen content of the inert gas delivery at or below the permitted maximum?

8.50PAre the vapour spaces in the cargo tanks being maintained at positive pressure?

8.51PDoes the oxygen content in the cargo tanks meet IMO requirements?

8.52PWas the fixed oxygen analyser calibrated immediately prior to use of the inert gas system?

8.53PDo the readings on the local, bridge and cargo control room oxygen and pressure recorders, where fitted, agree?

8.54PIs the liquid level in the deck seal correct and clearly visible?

8.55PDoes the p/v breaker appear to be in good order?

8.56PCan double hull spaces be inerted?

Crude Oil Washing:

If the vessel is not fitted with a crude oil washing system questions 8.57 to 8.68 need not be answered, however if the vessel has a crude oil washing system but is not in use at the time of inspection then question 8.57 to 8.68 should still be answered. If the vessel is not fitted with a crude oil washing system, then questions 8.57 to 8.68 will be removed within the inspector's programme software.

8.57PIs the vessel fitted with a crude oil washing system?

8.58PIf crude oil washing is being carried out are the tanks being Crude oil washed in accordance with IMO requirements?

8.59PIs an approved Crude Oil Washing Operations and Equipment Manual provided?

8.60PIf the vessel is crude oil washing, has a checklist been completed?

8.61PIs the person in charge of COW operations suitably qualified?

8.62PDo records indicate that the crude oil washing system was pressure tested prior to use?

8.63PDo records indicate that oxygen readings of the tanks to be crude oil washed have been checked by portable meter and found to be within maximum permissible limits?

8.64PHas a crude oil washing plan been prepared and is it being followed?

8.65PAre crude oil washing line pressure gauges working?

8.66PIs the tank cleaning heater, where fitted, effectively isolated from the crude oil washing line?

8.67PAre any hydrant-type connections on the crude oil washing lines securely sealed?

8.68PAre records maintained of previous COW operations?

Static Electricity Precautions:

Notes: ISGOTT Chapter 3 addresses the hazards associated with static electricity. ISGOTT Chapter 11 addresses the precautions that must be taken when handling static accumulator cargoes in more detail. Provided that a tank is maintained in an inert condition when static non-accumulator cargoes are being handled, or when it can be guaranteed that the tank atmosphere is non-flammable, no anti-static precautions are necessary. Questions 8.69 to 8.76 are applicable to vessels carrying static accumulator cargoes in non-inert tanks. If the cargo is not a static accumulator or if the tanks are properly inerted, these questions will be removed from the inspector's programme software. Static accumulator cargoes are all those except fuel with anti-static additive, heavy black fuel oils, conductive crude oil, bitumen, alcohols and ketones.(See ISGOTT Table 3.1)

8.69PAre precautions relating to maximum flow rates during initial loading being observed?

8.70PAre required settling periods being observed?

8.71PWhere vapour locks are fitted to cargo tanks that are not fitted with full depth sounding pipes, are static electricity precautions taken to ensure that the appropriate relaxation period elapses prior to ullaging or sampling?

8.72PAre metal tapes and other gauging or sampling devices effectively bonded before being introduced into tanks?

8.73PAre natural fibre ropes, as opposed to synthetic, used for dipping etc.?

8.74PIf portable tank cleaning hoses are used, are continuity tests carried out and the results recorded?

8.75PAre personnel aware of the hazards associated with tank cleaning after the carriage of volatile products?

8.76PAre personnel aware of the need to avoid the free fall of liquid into tanks?

Manifold Arrangements:

8.77PAre the manifolds in good order?

8.78PAre manifold pressure gauges fitted outboard of the manifold valves on both sides of the vessel and are they in good order?

8.79PAre pressure gauges also fitted to the offshore manifolds and regularly checked during cargo transfer for manifold valve leakage?

8.80PAre manifold pressure gauges fitted with valves or cocks?

8.81PAre manifold blank flanges of an equivalent rating to that of the manifold pipelines?

8.82PIf the vessel is fitted with vapour return manifolds, are they in good order?

8.83PIf the vapour return manifolds are designed for use at single buoy moorings, do they comply with requirements?

8.84PDoes the vessel’s piping system appear to be free of unauthorised inter-connections between cargo, bunker and ballast systems?

Pump rooms:

This section applies to all pump rooms if fitted, including Cargo Pump Rooms, Ballast Pump Rooms and Fuel Oil Transfer Pump Rooms.

8.85POn vessels with pump rooms, are they free of evidence of significant leaks from machinery, pipework, valve glands and instrumentation?

8.86PAre bulkhead seals gas tight and, if required, well lubricated?

8.87PIs the cargo pump room gas monitoring system in good order and regularly checked?

8.88PAre pump rooms clean, tidy and free of combustible material?

8.89PAre the pump room bilges free of cargo product?

8.90PIs the level of lighting in the pump room adequate?

Cargo hoses:

8.91PIf the vessel uses its own cargo hoses, are they in good order, pressure tested annually to their design working pressure and is a record of all hose tests and inspections maintained on board?

Cargo lifting equipment:

8.92PAre all cargo derricks, cranes and other lifting equipment properly marked and has periodical testing and inspection been carried out?

8.93PAre winches associated with lifting equipment in good order?

Ship to ship transfer operations - petroleum

Questions 8.94-8.98 ask for basic information to determine if the vessel can be considered for off-shore STS. If the vessel is equipped with specialised equipment for regular STS transfer operations such as fenders and hoses, the fact should be recorded in Additional comments. If the vessel is NOT utilised for regular commercial ship-to-ship cargo transfer, Questions 8.94-97 must be answered ‘NA’.

8.94PAre operator’s procedures provided for ship to ship operations?

8.95PAre sufficient closed fairleads and mooring bitts provided?

8.96PAre ship-to-ship transfer checklists completed?

8.97PIf a ship-to-ship transfer was in progress during the inspection, was it conducted in accordance with the recommendations of the OCIMF/ICS STS Transfer Guide?

8. Cargo and Ballast Systems – Chemical

Notes: This chapter can only be completed if the vessel is provided with a Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk or International Pollution Prevention Certificate for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances (NLS).If a vessel is certified as a chemical tanker and sometimes carries Annex I cargoes, it shall be inspected as a chemical tanker, irrespective of the cargo on board at the time of the inspection. However, if the on-board records reveal that the vessel is being used for oil cargoes only, the vessel shall be inspected as an oil tanker.In answering the questions below, note that the IBC Code applies only to those vessels where the keel was laid on or after 1st July 1986.The BCH Code applies to vessels whose keel was laid or which were at a similar stage of construction on or after 12th April 1972. It also applies to vessels constructed before this date, except for the construction provisions of BCH 1.7.3 (a) to (f).Effective 1st January 2007, revisions to MARPOL Annex II re-categorised products into X, Y, Z and Other Substances (OS). The pollution hazards and carriage requirements of all chemicals have been re-evaluated. Categories X, Y and Z carriage requirements are set out in Chapter 17 of the IBC Code. Category Z cargoes are also set out in Chapter 18 of the IBC Code along with OS cargoes. P and A Manuals for all vessels carrying Category X, Y or Z cargoes must have been re-approved prior to 1st January 2007.The MEPC.2 Circular provides a provisional categorisation of liquid substances and is issued in December each year. The current Circular is MEPC.2/Circ.16 (2011). Under normal circumstances chapters 17 and 18 of the IBC Code take precedence over List 1 of the MEPC.2 Circular, in this exceptional case, the entries in Annex 1 List 1: Pure and technically pure products, which apply to ‘all countries’ and no expiry date, supersede those in the IBC Code.Category X: NLS which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or deballasting operations, are deemed to present a major hazard to either marine resources or human health and, therefore, justify the prohibition of the discharge into the marine environment;Category Y: NLS which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or deballasting operations, are deemed to present a hazard to either marine resources or human health or cause harm to amenities or other legitimate uses of the sea and therefore justify a limitation on the quality and quantity of the discharge into the marine environment;Category Z: NLS which, if discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or deballasting operations, are deemed to present a minor hazard to either marine or human health and therefore justify less stringent restrictions on the quality and quantity of the discharge into the marine environment;Category OS: Substances which have been evaluated and found to fall outside Categories X, y, or Z because they are considered to present no harm to marine resources, human health, amenities or other legitimate uses of the sea when discharged into the sea from tank cleaning or deballasting operations. The discharge of bilge or ballast water or other residues or mixtures containing these substances are not subject to any requirements of MARPOL Annex II.The carriage of Category Z requires only a NLS Certificate. The carriage of Category OS will not require either but in practice the class society will probably supply the vessel with a list of the cargoes to present to port authorities if required.Category Z cargoes are not regulated by the Chemical Code, but are regulated as a pollutant under MARPOL Annex II. ‘Other Substances’ are regulated neither by the Chemical Code as a chemical nor by MARPOL as a pollutant.Oil-Like Noxious Liquid Substances may, after 1st January 2007, only be carried on chemical tankers.Under the MARPOL Annex II amendments the Baltic and Black Sea Special Areas will no longer apply after 1st January 2007. The only chemical Special Area will be the Antarctic south of 600 South.

Policies, Procedures and Documentation:

8.1CIs the vessel provided with company policy statements, instructions and procedures with regard to safe cargo operations?

8.2CIs information readily available on maximum loading rates and venting capacities?

8.3CAre legible and up to date pipeline and/or mimic diagrams of cargo, inert gas and venting systems available in the cargo control area?

8.4CIs there a Procedures and Arrangements Manual available?

8.5CIs the Cargo Record Book correctly completed and up to date?

8.6CAre there procedures for tank cleaning after flammable and toxic products, using chemicals and solvents, gas freeing and for steaming cargo tanks?

8.7CAre tank cleaning guidelines available?

Stability and Cargo Loading Limitations:

The Master of the ship shall be supplied with a loading and stability information booklet. This booklet shall contain details of typical service and ballast conditions, provisions for evaluating other conditions of loading and a summary of the ship’s survival capabilities. In addition, the booklet shall contain sufficient information to enable the Master to load and operate the ship in a safe and seaworthy manner.

8.8CHave stability calculations and where applicable stress calculations, been performed for the current cargo operation?

8.9CIs the stress and stability information included with the cargo plan and are any limitations understood by the cargo watch officers?

8.10CAre damage stability guidelines available?

8.11CIs the Master aware of the worst damage stability condition in the stability book?

8.12CIs the vessel free of inherent intact stability problems?

8.13CIf a loading computer or programme is in use, is it class approved?

8.14CAre there records indicating that the operational accuracy of the load computer is tested regularly?

8.15CAre longitudinal stresses, where applicable, maintained within design limits throughout

8.16CAre cargo and/or ballast tanks free of sloshing or weight restrictions?Important restrictions other than those normally applied such as maximum density should be recorded in Other comments.

8.17CWhere applicable, are officers aware of the dangers of high free surface effects and of the possibility of structural damage caused by sloshing in cargo tanks?

8.18CDo the operator’s operating manuals include procedures for restoring stability in case of unstable conditions developing during cargo operations, where applicable?

Cargo Operations and Related Safety Management:

8.19CAre the cargoes being carried listed on the Certificate of Fitness or IPPC for the Carriage of Noxious Liquid Substances in bulk?

8.20CAre all officers familiar with the cargo system?

8.21CAre all officers familiar with the carriage requirements for the cargoes on board and chemicals in general?

8.22CWhen an unfamiliar chemical is to be carried, is there a procedure to review the safety aspects and handling procedures?

8.23CIs a cargo compatibility chart available?

8.24CHas a cargo-handling plan been prepared which provides a detailed sequence of cargo and ballast transfer?

8.25CHas the cargo plan been signed by the watch officers to indicate their understanding of it?

8.26CAre cargo operations being carried out and logged in accordance with the plan?

8.27CIf the cargo is required to be inhibited, is the required information available?

8.28CAre the dangers associated with co-mingling non-compatible cargoes in slop tanks and drip trays considered?

8.29CAre all officers aware of the emergency procedures for dealing with leakage, spillage or fire involving the cargo?

8.30CIs the verbal communication between the ship and the shore adequate?

8.31CIs a tank cleaning plan established prior to cleaning operations?

8.32CAre officers aware of the dangers associated with tank cleaning operations after the carriage of volatile or toxic products?

8.33CHave satisfactory column/cofferdam purging routines been established where deep well pumps are fitted?

8.34CWhere cargo tanks are of stainless steel are there procedures for passivation and pickling?

8.35CAre adequate procedures in place for carrying out wall wash tests?

8.36CIs the cargo sample locker situated within the main cargo area and is it in good order?

8.37CIs the cargo sample locker suitably constructed to prevent breakages?

8.38CIs the cargo sample locker adequately ventilated?

Cargo Handling and Monitoring Equipment:

8.39CAre the cargo, ballast and stripping pumps, eductors and their associated instrumentation and controls , in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.40CAre the cargo and ballast pump bearing, casing and shaft gland temperature monitoring sensors in good order and is there evidence of regular testing?

8.41CAre the cargo lines, vapour lines and inert gas lines in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.42CIs the cargo pump emergency shutdown system in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.43CAre the cargo and ballast system valves in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.44CAre the cargo system ullage gauges, vapour locks and UTI tapes in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.45CAre the remote and local temperature and pressure sensors and gauges in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.46CAre the cargo tank high level and overflow alarms in good order and is there recorded evidence of regular testing?

8.47CAre pipeline drains and stub pieces valved and capped and in good order?

8.48CAre cargo line drains suitably positioned to preclude liquid remaining in the line after draining?

8.49CAre cargo pipelines tested annually?

8.50CIs the cargo tank high-level alarm system independent of both the gauging devices and the overflow-control alarm system?

8.51CAre there records of the calibration of key cargo instrumentation, including temperature and pressure gauges?

8.52CIs the inert gas system and/or storage and associated pipework, where fitted, in good order?

8.53CIs the general condition of the cargo tank heating system satisfactory?

Ullaging, Sampling and Closed Operations:

8.54CAre vapour locks, where fitted, calibrated and certified by a recognised cargo inspection organisation?

8.55CIf fixed tank gauges are not fitted, are sufficient portable tapes provided to simultaneously gauge each tank being worked?

8.56CIs the vessel capable of operating in a closed condition if volatile or toxic products are handled, including ullaging and sampling?

.57CIf the vessel is handling volatile or toxic cargoes, is it operating in a closed condition at the time of the inspection?

8.58CDo tank hatches, tank cleaning apertures and sighting ports appear to be liquid and gas tight?

Venting Arrangements:

The requirements for inert gas systems for chemical carriers are contained in SOLAS II-2/4.5.5.2. Chapter 15 of the FSS Code (page 41) gives further details on the equipment standards. SOLAS II-2/4.5.5.2 also refers to IMO Resolution A.567(14) – Regulations for Inert Gas Systems on Chemical Tankers, which can be found in the IMO publication Inert Gas Systems.

8.59CIs the cargo venting system in good order?

8.60CIs the cargo venting system being operated correctly?

8.61CAre SOLAS secondary venting requirements being complied with?

8.62CAre the p/v valves in good order, inspected and cleaned as part of a regular planned maintenance routine and are there records to support this?

8.63CAre flame screens easily accessible and removable, in good order and inspected and cleaned as part of a regular maintenance routine and are there records available?

8.64CIf the vessel is operating with a vapour return line connected, are appropriate transfer procedures in place?

Static Electricity Precautions:

Notes: ISGOTT Chapter 3 addresses the hazards associated with static electricity. ISGOTT Chapter 11 addresses the precautions that must be taken when handling static accumulator cargoes in more detail. Provided that a tank is maintained in an inert condition, when static non-accumulator cargoes are being handled, or when it can be guaranteed that the tank atmosphere is non-flammable, no anti-static precautions are necessary.Questions 8.65 to 8.73 should only be completed for vessels carrying static accumulator cargoes in non-inert tanks. If the cargo is not a static accumulator or if the tanks are inerted, answer these questions ‘NA’.Static accumulator petroleum cargoes are all those except crude oils, residual fuel oils, black diesel oils and asphalts (bitumens). Some chemicals are known static accumulators and examples are Cumene, Cyclohexane, Diethylether, Heptanes, MTBE, Nonene, Octenes, Styrene, Toluene and Xylene. In case of doubt it should be assumed that a product is a static accumulator and the appropriate precautions should be taken.

8.65CAre precautions relating to maximum flow rates during initial loading being observed?

8.66CAre required settling periods being observed?

8.67C Where vapour locks are fitted to cargo tanks that are not fitted with full depth sounding pipes, are static electricity precautions taken to ensure that the appropriate relaxation period elapses prior to ullaging or sampling?

8.68CAre metal tapes and other gauging or sampling devices effectively bonded before being introduced into tanks?

8.69CIf portable tank cleaning hoses are used, are continuity tests carried out and the results recorded?

8.70CAre personnel aware of the hazards associated with tank cleaning after the carriage of volatile products?

8.71CAre personnel aware of the hazards associated with steaming cargo tanks after the carriage of volatile products?

8.72CAre personnel aware of the need to avoid the free fall of liquid into tanks?

8.73CAre cargo pipe joints bonded?

Manifold Arrangements:

8.74CAre cargo manifold arrangements satisfactory?

8.75CAre manifold pressure gauges fitted outboard of the manifold valves and are they in good order?

8.76CAre pressure gauges also fitted to the offshore manifolds and regularly checked during the discharge for manifold valve leakage?

8.77CAre manifold pressure gauges fitted with valves or cocks?

8.78CAre all flange connections fully bolted?

8.79CAre manifold blank flanges of an equivalent rating to that of the manifold pipelines?

8.80CAre the manifold valves and lines marked to identify the tank or tanks they serve

8.81CAre the manifolds fitted with drain lines and purge points and are they valved and capped?

8.82CIs the vessel free of unauthorised inter-connections between cargo, bunker and ballast systems?

Cargo Pump Room:

This section applies to all pump rooms if fitted, including Cargo Pump Rooms, Ballast Pump Rooms and Fuel Oil Transfer Pump Rooms.

8.83COn vessels with pump rooms, are they free of evidence of significant leaks from machinery, pipework, valve glands and instrumentation?

8.84CAre bulkhead seals gas tight and, if required, well lubricated?

8.85CIs the cargo pump room gas monitoring system in good order and regularly checked?

8.86CIs the bilge pump in good order and can it be operated from a position outside the pump room?

8.87CAre discharge pressure gauges provided outside where a cargo pump room is fitted and are they in good order?

Safety Equipment:

8.88CIs the vessel provided with the protective equipment required by the IBC or BCH Codes?

8.89CIs the vessel provided with the safety equipment required by the IBC or BCH Codes?

8.90CIs the safety equipment correctly located?

8.91CIs the safety equipment required by the IBC or BCH Codes examined by an expert agency annually and are records available?

8.92CIs the safety equipment inspected on board monthly and are records available

8.93CAre emergency escape sets provided for every person on board where required?

8.94CWhere filter-type respirators have been provided, is there an adequate system of control in place?

8.95CAre decontamination showers and an eye-wash, where required, provided in suitably marked locations?

8.96CIs the type of foam compound suitable for the cargoes which the vessel is certified to carry?

Cargo Hoses:

8.97CIf the vessel uses its own cargo hoses, are they in good order, pressure tested annually to their design working pressure and is a record of all hose tests and inspections maintained on board?

Cargo Lifting Equipment:

8.98CAre all cargo derricks, cranes and other lifting equipment properly marked and has periodical testing and inspection been carried out?

8.99CAre winches associated with lifting equipment in good order?

Chapter 9. Mooring

(section name not set)

Notes: The OCIMF publications Effective Mooring, Mooring Equipment Guidelines and Anchoring Systems and Procedures. provide information on all aspects of mooring equipment and operations.Common causes of accidents are an inadequate understanding of good mooring practices, unattended mooring lines, a mixture of wire and non-wire moorings, unbalanced mooring arrangements, poor quality of mooring lines, poor maintenance of mooring equipment, insufficient knowledge of local conditions, inattention to weather and tidal conditions and passing traffic.It should be noted that there are differences between editions 2 and 3 of Mooring Equipment Guidelines 2 with respect to the requirements for the SWL of mooring fittings, and that vessels constructed before the 3rd edition was published may not comply with that edition. Mooring Equipment Guidelines is based upon the recommendations of ISO 3913.

Mooring Equipment Documentation:

9.1Are certificates available for all mooring ropes and wires?

9.2Do all mooring ropes and where fitted, mooring wire tails, meet OCIMF guidelines?

9.3If one or more bow stoppers are fitted is a certificate attesting to the safe working load provided?

9.4Are there records of the inspection and maintenance of mooring ropes, wires and equipment?

9.5Is there a policy in place for the testing of winch brakes and are the results recorded?

Mooring Procedures:

9.6Are moorings satisfactorily deployed and tended?

9.7Are mooring lines secured to bitts and turned up correctly?

9.8Are all powered mooring lines correctly reeled on drums?

9.9Are all powered mooring lines secured on brakes and are the winches out of gear?

9.10On split drum winches are all the lines made fast with no more than one layer on each tension side of the drum?

9.11If mooring tails are fitted to wires, do they have proper connecting links and are they correctly fitted?

9.12Are all mooring lines stowed neatly to minimise tripping hazards and are mooring areas clear and unobstructed?

Mooring Equipment:

9.13Are mooring winches in good order?

9.14Do mooring winch foundations appear to be in good order?

9.15Do brake linings, drums and pins appear to be in good order?

9.16If mooring winches in a gas hazardous area are electrically powered, are motors Ex ‘d’ rated?

9.17If mooring winches are electrically powered, are insulation tests carried out and the results recorded?

9.18Are mooring wires, ropes and synthetic tails in good order?

9.19Are pedestal fairleads, roller fairleads and other rollers well greased and free to turn and are bitts and chocks free of grooving?

9.20Is mooring equipment marked with its SWL?

Anchoring Equipment:

9.21Are windlasses, anchors, locking bars and cables in good order and operating effectively?

9.22Except whilst alongside, when locking bars should be in place, were the anchors cleared and ready for immediate use during port entry?

9.23Are bitter end securing arrangements unobstructed and outside the chain locker?

9.24Are the chain locker doors securely battened down?

Single Point Moorings:

9.25Is single point mooring (SPM) and associated equipment fitted to OCIMF recommendations?

9.26If the vessel is equipped for mooring at single point moorings, does it meet the recommendations as applicable, contained in Mooring Equipment Guidelines (3rd Edition)?

9.27If the vessel is fitted with a hydraulically operated bow stopper, are safeguards provided to prevent its accidental release?

Confirmation

Signature